Monday, June 08, 2009

Peru: Alan Garcia's fascist state

Alan Garcia last night in reference to the government reported deaths of some 20 police in Bagua (picture note: those are actual Peruvian riot police):
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"When one thinks of the final moments of those officers who were disarmed, tied up and then had their throats slit like animals, one understands the barbarity and savageness [...] There is a conspiracy aimed at stopping us from using our natural resources for the good, growth and quality of life of our people,"
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Additionally, Garcia is blaming incitement for the protests on "foreign" influence, namely the leftist governments of Venezuela and Bolivia rather than his selling of 72% of the Peruvian Amazon to multinational corporations.
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Simply put, via Mate Pastor: "The government is using the death of members of the police force to incite citizens against our indigenous compatriots. This is a fascist attitude and must be denounced, even to international organisms."
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Otto elaborates: "The tactics being used right now are similar to classic police-state governments: disinform, misinform, deflect, blame a bugbear or two and then rouse the rabble with fiery, polemic rhetoric. García's speech yesterday wil be defined as "defiant" by supporters, but it was laden with things such as "600,000 natives have to answer to 38 million Peruvians". In García's world, natives aren't Peruvians. In García's world, he has all the country behind him on this (neatly forgetting his 30% and dropping approal ratings). In García's world, the protests are due to "outside influences", whih only works in the Republic of Lima country model. The man is a shameless disgrace and has no place in mature, 21st century politics."
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The Western press is shamefully following Alan's example, leading all stories of Bagua with police deaths while understating the civilian massacre, see Fox News and the New York Times prostitute known as Simon Romero.
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Canadian activist Ben Powless:
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"What we've been hearing from some of the communities is that a lot of the death tolls and the number of people hurt or injured are dramatically different from the Government figures, which put it as low as three to nine Indigenous people who have been killed," he said.
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"But we have heard from some representatives on the ground that there may be as many as 100 people murdered.
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"There was an active attempt by the Government here to portray it as a massacre of policemen who went into an area and were killed on their job, when in reality, native participants were sitting in blockades early in the morning [on Friday] when the police attacked."
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"A lot of reports aren't making it out of the communities, the Government has a near monopoly on being able to get their own message out about the situation and convene press conferences, and I have not been able to go into the Amazon region yet as the military has taken control and restricted access."
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Several international solidarity actions have taken place, in Washington DC, New York, Botoga.

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